Experts say public registries don’t reduce assault — and sex offenders are increasingly challenging the rules in court
Frank Lindsay, 62, is a father, small-business owner and avid surfer. He’s also one of 105,000 people in California — and 760,000 nationally — listed as a sex offender. In accordance with federal law, his name, photograph and home address appear in a public, online offender registry. In 1979, Lindsay, then 27, was convicted of lewd and lascivious acts with a minor under the age of 14.
“I thought I could do whatever I wanted,” Lindsay says. “Add on some alcohol, and I was a real asshole.”

Today, Lindsay considers himself a reformed man. He says he hasn’t had a drink in 30 years, is a Taoist and advocate for restorative justice — encouraging violent people to make amends for their actions. But, he says, “It seems that I can never be forgiven.”
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by Puck Lo
(Photo: Daniel Dreifuss)

Experts say public registries don’t reduce assault — and sex offenders are increasingly challenging the rules in court

Frank Lindsay, 62, is a father, small-business owner and avid surfer. He’s also one of 105,000 people in California — and 760,000 nationally — listed as a sex offender. In accordance with federal law, his name, photograph and home address appear in a public, online offender registry. In 1979, Lindsay, then 27, was convicted of lewd and lascivious acts with a minor under the age of 14.

“I thought I could do whatever I wanted,” Lindsay says. “Add on some alcohol, and I was a real asshole.”

Today, Lindsay considers himself a reformed man. He says he hasn’t had a drink in 30 years, is a Taoist and advocate for restorative justice — encouraging violent people to make amends for their actions. But, he says, “It seems that I can never be forgiven.”

Continue reading

by Puck Lo

(Photo: Daniel Dreifuss)

After repelling ISIL, PKK fighters are the new heroes of Kurdistan
ERBIL, Iraq — The body of Zanyar Kawa is making its final journey to Sulaymaniyah, in northeastern Iraq. The slain fighter died 500 miles from his hometown battling the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL, in Kobane, a Syrian town near the Turkish border.
Read more. 
by Alia Malek
(Photo: Ayman Oghanna/Al Jazeera America) 

After repelling ISIL, PKK fighters are the new heroes of Kurdistan

ERBIL, Iraq — The body of Zanyar Kawa is making its final journey to Sulaymaniyah, in northeastern Iraq. The slain fighter died 500 miles from his hometown battling the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL, in Kobane, a Syrian town near the Turkish border.

Read more. 

by Alia Malek

(Photo: Ayman Oghanna/Al Jazeera America) 

Rev. Augustus Tolton: the 19th century escaped slave was the first known African-American Catholic priest

he students of Father Tolton Catholic High School in Columbia weren’t in Chicago when the dossier containing four years of research on the man after whom their school was named was sealed with red wax and sent off to the Vatican.
For the Tolton Trailblazers, the canonization of their namesake would mean a change in the name of their school, the first Catholic high school in this central Missouri college town and the only school in the world named for him.

It may not be too long before Father Augustus Tolton, the first known black Roman Catholic priest in the United States, becomes St. Augustus.
by Ryan Schuessler
(Photo: Father Tolton Guild)

Rev. Augustus Tolton: the 19th century escaped slave was the first known African-American Catholic priest

he students of Father Tolton Catholic High School in Columbia weren’t in Chicago when the dossier containing four years of research on the man after whom their school was named was sealed with red wax and sent off to the Vatican.

For the Tolton Trailblazers, the canonization of their namesake would mean a change in the name of their school, the first Catholic high school in this central Missouri college town and the only school in the world named for him.

It may not be too long before Father Augustus Tolton, the first known black Roman Catholic priest in the United States, becomes St. Augustus.

by Ryan Schuessler

(Photo: Father Tolton Guild)

States that box women into illegal alternatives become complicit in their alleged misconduct
In January 2012, Jennifer Whalen purchased two drugs — mifepristone and misoprostol — without a prescription from an online pharmacy to help her 16-year-old daughter have an at-home abortion. Whalen was charged with a third-degree felony for violating Pennsylvania’s legal code, which allows only licensed physicians to perform abortions. On Sept. 5 she was sentenced to nine to 18 months in prison and received one year of probation for the misdemeanor of dispensing a drug without a pharmacist’s license.

Montour County District Attorney Rebecca Warren says her office had no choice but to press charges. Whalen “endanger[ed] the welfare of a child through the unauthorized practice of medicine and pharmacy,” she said. The district attorney is right: Whalen broke the law and endangered her daughter, so some punitive response is appropriate. But is her punishment morally fair?
Read more
by Susan Dwyer
(Photo: Phil Walter/Getty)

States that box women into illegal alternatives become complicit in their alleged misconduct

In January 2012, Jennifer Whalen purchased two drugs — mifepristone and misoprostol — without a prescription from an online pharmacy to help her 16-year-old daughter have an at-home abortion. Whalen was charged with a third-degree felony for violating Pennsylvania’s legal code, which allows only licensed physicians to perform abortions. On Sept. 5 she was sentenced to nine to 18 months in prison and received one year of probation for the misdemeanor of dispensing a drug without a pharmacist’s license.

Montour County District Attorney Rebecca Warren says her office had no choice but to press charges. Whalen “endanger[ed] the welfare of a child through the unauthorized practice of medicine and pharmacy,” she said. The district attorney is right: Whalen broke the law and endangered her daughter, so some punitive response is appropriate. But is her punishment morally fair?

Read more

by Susan Dwyer

(Photo: Phil Walter/Getty)