Anti-Islam ad featuring James Foley pulled from NYC buses: Group decides not to run one of the controversial ads after receiving complaints from slain journalist’s family

A group that bankrolled a series of anti-Islam ads to be displayed on New York City buses and in its subway system decided to pull one of the spots after receiving complaints from the family of slain American journalist James Foley, who was executed by a member of the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in August.

Blogger Pamela Geller and the far-right group American Freedom Defense Initiative (AFDI), which paid $100,000 to New York’s Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) for six advertisements with anti-Islam messages, withdrew the spot at the 11th hour. The other five ads will run for four weeks beginning on Monday.
Continue reading
By Marisa Taylor
Photo credit: Patrick Sison/AP

Anti-Islam ad featuring James Foley pulled from NYC buses: Group decides not to run one of the controversial ads after receiving complaints from slain journalist’s family

A group that bankrolled a series of anti-Islam ads to be displayed on New York City buses and in its subway system decided to pull one of the spots after receiving complaints from the family of slain American journalist James Foley, who was executed by a member of the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in August.

Blogger Pamela Geller and the far-right group American Freedom Defense Initiative (AFDI), which paid $100,000 to New York’s Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) for six advertisements with anti-Islam messages, withdrew the spot at the 11th hour. The other five ads will run for four weeks beginning on Monday.

Continue reading

By Marisa Taylor

Photo credit: Patrick Sison/AP

Green movement embracing more radical tactics as desperation grows: Organizers say climate change crisis narrowing divisions between traditional green groups, reformist factions 
Hundreds of thousands of people marched recently in the biggest climate-related demonstration ever. The slogan of the march: “To change everything, we need everyone.”
A day later hundreds of people were arrested in downtown Manhattan for blocking traffic as part of the Flood Wall Street demonstration. The protesters’ slogan: “Stop capitalism. End the climate crisis.”
The two events, within 24 hours of each other and just a few miles apart, juxtaposed what have been two factions in the larger climate movement. The climate march highlighted the big-tent approach to organizing. Groups with widely differing and often conflicting ideals came together to broadcast a message that climate change is important — which they accomplished — but offered few solutions.\
Photo credit: Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty
By: Peter Moskowitz

Green movement embracing more radical tactics as desperation grows: Organizers say climate change crisis narrowing divisions between traditional green groups, reformist factions 

Hundreds of thousands of people marched recently in the biggest climate-related demonstration ever. The slogan of the march: “To change everything, we need everyone.”

A day later hundreds of people were arrested in downtown Manhattan for blocking traffic as part of the Flood Wall Street demonstration. The protesters’ slogan: “Stop capitalism. End the climate crisis.”

The two events, within 24 hours of each other and just a few miles apart, juxtaposed what have been two factions in the larger climate movement. The climate march highlighted the big-tent approach to organizing. Groups with widely differing and often conflicting ideals came together to broadcast a message that climate change is important — which they accomplished — but offered few solutions.\

Photo credit: Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty

By: Peter Moskowitz

Opinion: America needs marijuana bars
For building a national pub culture, pot is better than alcohol.
Blogger-pundit Matt Yglesias really wants more bars. First at Think Progress, then at Slate and now at Vox, the commentator has waged a one-man rhetorical war on the country’s urban liquor boards. The current licensing system, in which the number of bars is constrained by city bureaucrats rather than market demand, Yglesias has argued, leaves us with a paucity of public drinking spots where they’re wanted. From New York’s East Village to Adams Morgan in Washington, D.C., license limitations have caused bars to become rare, expensive, crowded and all around worse.
There’s just one problem with Yglesias’ more-bars plan: alcohol. America has a serious issue with responsible drinking, and increasing the number of sales locations probably won’t help. Alcohol abuse already kills tens of thousands of Americans annually and costs hundreds of billions of dollars a year in lost productivity, health care and property damage. It’s an especially big problem for college students and other young people; Jake New reported for Insider Higher Educationthat at least eight college freshman died in the first few weeks of school this year, most in alcohol-related accidents or overdoses. “Over the last 10 years, we’ve seen a fairly dramatic increase of alcohol-related hospitalizations in this age group,” George Koob, the director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism at the National Institutes of Health, told New. More bars would contribute to what’s already a public health crisis. Studies in Los Angeles and Cleveland suggest adding a bar is associated with about three additional violent crimes a year.
Continue article…
By Malcolm Harris
Photo credit: Nick Adams/Reuters

Opinion: America needs marijuana bars

For building a national pub culture, pot is better than alcohol.

Blogger-pundit Matt Yglesias really wants more bars. First at Think Progress, then at Slate and now at Vox, the commentator has waged a one-man rhetorical war on the country’s urban liquor boards. The current licensing system, in which the number of bars is constrained by city bureaucrats rather than market demand, Yglesias has argued, leaves us with a paucity of public drinking spots where they’re wanted. From New York’s East Village to Adams Morgan in Washington, D.C., license limitations have caused bars to become rare, expensive, crowded and all around worse.

There’s just one problem with Yglesias’ more-bars plan: alcohol. America has a serious issue with responsible drinking, and increasing the number of sales locations probably won’t help. Alcohol abuse already kills tens of thousands of Americans annually and costs hundreds of billions of dollars a year in lost productivity, health care and property damage. It’s an especially big problem for college students and other young people; Jake New reported for Insider Higher Educationthat at least eight college freshman died in the first few weeks of school this year, most in alcohol-related accidents or overdoses. “Over the last 10 years, we’ve seen a fairly dramatic increase of alcohol-related hospitalizations in this age group,” George Koob, the director of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism at the National Institutes of Health, told New. More bars would contribute to what’s already a public health crisis. Studies in Los Angeles and Cleveland suggest adding a bar is associated with about three additional violent crimes a year.

Continue article…

By Malcolm Harris

Photo credit: Nick Adams/Reuters

Family of detained UK citizen in Iran plea for her release
Ghoncheh Ghavami, a 25-year-old United Kingdom-Iranian citizen, has been in prison in Tehran since June 29 after being arrested for trying to enter a stadium to view a men’s volleyball game. Now her brother has gone to New York in the hope of bringing her case to the attention of Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani, in town for the United Nations General Assembly.
Continue reading.
Photo by Ghavami family 
By D. Parvaz

Family of detained UK citizen in Iran plea for her release

Ghoncheh Ghavami, a 25-year-old United Kingdom-Iranian citizen, has been in prison in Tehran since June 29 after being arrested for trying to enter a stadium to view a men’s volleyball game. Now her brother has gone to New York in the hope of bringing her case to the attention of Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani, in town for the United Nations General Assembly.

Continue reading.

Photo by Ghavami family 

By D. Parvaz