The brave new world of biohacking

PITTSBURGH — In the basement of a suburban two-story house on a quiet road just outside of Pittsburgh, six mostly self-taught scientists tinker with an assortment of computer parts and electric equipment. They plan one day on becoming cyborgs — a future that may be closer than you think.
They are Grindhouse Wetware — a team of three men and three women — and they describe themselves as a “rag tag group of programmers, engineers and enthusiasts” who build cybernetic devices. They find inspiration in both current technology and science fiction.
"I don’t want to go to space in a spaceship; I want to be a spaceship,” said Tim Cannon, Grindhouse’s 34-year-old co-founder, whose basement serves as the group’s headquarters and scientific lab.

Read more
Photo: Melissa Farlow for Al Jazeera America

The brave new world of biohacking

PITTSBURGH — In the basement of a suburban two-story house on a quiet road just outside of Pittsburgh, six mostly self-taught scientists tinker with an assortment of computer parts and electric equipment. They plan one day on becoming cyborgs — a future that may be closer than you think.

They are Grindhouse Wetware — a team of three men and three women — and they describe themselves as a “rag tag group of programmers, engineers and enthusiasts” who build cybernetic devices. They find inspiration in both current technology and science fiction.

"I don’t want to go to space in a spaceship; I want to be a spaceship,” said Tim Cannon, Grindhouse’s 34-year-old co-founder, whose basement serves as the group’s headquarters and scientific lab.

Read more

Photo: Melissa Farlow for Al Jazeera America