Appeals court lets NYPD’s stop-and-frisk-go unmonitored for now

The U.S. Court of Appeals has allowed New York City’s controversial stop-and-frisk program to continue unmonitored while the city appeals a lower court’s ruling that found the program unconstitutional.
The Second Circuit Court’sruling, delivered on Thursday, also mandated that Judge Shira Scheindlin be removed from the case because she “ran afoul” of conduct codes by compromising the perception of her unbiasedness by appearing in media reports, and by abusing a rule that allows judges to take on new cases if they have ruled on similar ones in the past.
The decision is a big win for Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s administration, which has argued that thecity’s practice of stopping and searching peopleon the streets without a warrant makes the city safer and does not violate the rights of those stopped, most of whom are young black or Hispanic men.

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Photo:Allison Joyce/Getty Images

Appeals court lets NYPD’s stop-and-frisk-go unmonitored for now

The U.S. Court of Appeals has allowed New York City’s controversial stop-and-frisk program to continue unmonitored while the city appeals a lower court’s ruling that found the program unconstitutional.

The Second Circuit Court’sruling, delivered on Thursday, also mandated that Judge Shira Scheindlin be removed from the case because she “ran afoul” of conduct codes by compromising the perception of her unbiasedness by appearing in media reports, and by abusing a rule that allows judges to take on new cases if they have ruled on similar ones in the past.

The decision is a big win for Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s administration, which has argued that thecity’s practice of stopping and searching peopleon the streets without a warrant makes the city safer and does not violate the rights of those stopped, most of whom are young black or Hispanic men.

Read more

Photo:Allison Joyce/Getty Images